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 BRONZE 
This member is a YANA Mentor This is his Country or State Flag

K L lives in Alberta, Canada. He was 53 when he was diagnosed in February, 2017. His initial PSA was 13.00 ng/ml, his Gleason Score was 7a, and he was staged T2a. His choice of treatment was Surgery (Robotic Laparoscopic Prostatectomy). Here is his story.

Because of a family history of prostate cancer (my father and uncle both died from it in their mid 60s), I have been monitoring my PSA for a number of years, but let 4-5 years slip by for no particularly good reason. My PSA was high (13) and a surprise last February. Velocity was also high since it went from 3 to 13 in 5 years, and 13 to 15 between February and June. That combined with the aggressive cancers of my father and uncle caused a lot of worry. But both ultrasound and MRI indicated cancer was confined to the prostate.

I used the time between diagnosis and surgery on June 27, 2017 to get into shape. I think that helped quite a lot, and what else can you do anyway? I found it very hard to talk about the cancer before surgery so basically kept to close family. Now I am able to talk about it much more easily.

Surgery was not a hard decision for someone my age with the other indicators. I had a fairly high chance, given the high PSA and velocity of change, of having cancer outside the prostate. So I wanted to be aggressive and reserve the ability for radiation later if necessary. Also, I hope to live long enough that radiation might actually cause cancer if I get it now.

Hardest thing about surgery is choosing a good surgeon. Mine had done 300-400 of these procedures, but there are no report cards available. The skill of the surgeon in the single biggest factor in the outcome, and you need to take a leap of faith on that issue, and then hope he or she is having a good day.

Robotic surgery went uneventfully. Was in the hospital for a couple of days. Catheter out in a couple of weeks. Off pain killers at that time too. One of the very lucky ones that was continent within a day of getting the catheter out. I think the exercise regimen before surgery helped with that. Also potency is coming back, though more slowly.

Margins are good so far (cancer confined to prostate). Will get a PSA at end of the month and hope it is zero.

Stupidly went for a short run, rode my motorcycle and changed tires on my wife's vehicle last weekend. Stomach is a little sore. Assume that will clear in a day or two, but I need to take it more slowly, especially for lifting.

This has been a life changing experience. I have appreciated the stories from this site. Mine is so far as good as it gets. The lead up to the procedure was the most difficult. Now I am just dealing with it. I am enjoying all the good things in my life more and eliminating the bad things. I should have done that long ago. I wish you all the good luck I have enjoyed.


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