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Robert McGovern and Sally live in Connecticut, USA. He was 56 when he was diagnosed in December, 2009. His initial PSA was 7.40 ng/ml, his Gleason Score was 7b, and he was staged T1c. His choice of treatment was Surgery (Robotic Laparoscopic Prostatectomy). Here is his story.

I chose to have a radical prostatectomy due to the size of my enlarged prostate and was 56 years old at the time. I elected to have the surgery done at New York Presbyterian hospital where the surgeon had performed over 3000 surgeries. The morning after surgery I discovered that my surgeon had performed five surgeries the day of my surgery and I was the fifth one. The pathology report confirmed that the cancer was organ confined and the surgical margins were negative. The seminal vesicles, lymph nodes and vas deferens were uninvolved. The initial clinical stage was T1C prior to surgery. Following surgery the staging was upgraded to T2c. The surgeon explained to my wife that the prostate was enlarged and in one area was stuck to the bladder.

Urinary control was achieved within a couple of months by doing Kegel exercises. For the first six years my PSA was taken every three months and was undetectable using the "PSA-Total" method. In August 2016 the method used was switched to the "PSA Post-Prostatectomy" method and this revealed my PSA to be 0.08. Later I learned that the "PSA-Total" method is more accurate around 4.0 whereas the PSA "Post-Prostatectomy" method is more sensitive around 0.2. A subsequent PSA in December of 2016 showed it to be 0.11 and May 2017 it went up to 0.13 and as of October of 2017 it is now up to 0.17.

I visited my surgeon in February 2017 after the initial rise and he recommended to wait and see if the PSA ever gets to 0.2. I am scheduled to meet with him again in October 2017 and plan to discuss with him possible medications such as Avodart and metformin to bring my PSA down. I have been advised from a medical oncologist's office not to take the multi-vitamins I recently started taking and to not eat corn meal, corn bread, or popcorn and to follow a Mediterranean diet. I need to research to find out what my next course of action will be. I want to discuss with my surgeon the use of the PSMA test to show if the rising PSA is due to cancer recurrence and discuss the results of any genomic testing that may have done since my last visit.

Robert's e-mail address is: rjmcgovern AT snet.net (replace "AT" with "@")


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